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Connecting Digital Humanities Data With The Scholarly 3D Toolkit

now what can’t one do in Minecraft??? Reminds me of this..

‘Danish government creates entire country in Minecraft, users promptly blow it up and plant American flag
This is why we can’t have nice things.’

http://l.gamespot.com/1kEPPsY

DH101

Abstract. In the past decade, the application of 3D computer-based visualising technologies to cultural heritage has been widely accepted by archaeologists, architectural historians, and cultural authorities in general. During the years, the never-ending improvement of graphics technology allowed the quantity of archaeological models to sharply increase, as well as the quality of their 3D visualization. The aim of this paper is to argue that the importance of 3D modelling techniques for the rendering of buildings and ancient architectures has not to be assessed in relation to the degree of 3D graphic aesthetic quality [1], but as a powerful tool for scholars to combine 3D data with further documentation, sources and metadata.


– PROCEDURAL 3D COMPUTER MODELLING OF CULTURAL HERITAGE SITES

Figure 1. An aerial view of the Flavian Amphitheater (“Colosseum”) seen from the south [2].

As Marie Saldana claims in his paper [3]An integrated approach to…

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Virtual Serendipity: Can your sources surprise you ?

love that this course is online – great share!

DH101

With the massive digitization of our society and the penetration of technology in all areas of our everyday lives, sciences and education, many of today’s researchers find themselves working in virtual environment. Many consider that exploring sources online is less efficient then browsing shelves in a library, since in the digital world you only find what you’re looking for.

This topic is discussed in the article Designing the next big thing: Randomness versus serendipity in DH tools [1] . The article is focused on the new wave of initiatives to enhance the research practice of humanities scholars, as it compares multiple tools that are designed to generate unknown, but relevant links to existing documents in order to surprise the researcher and improve her research with a fact or a source she was not aware of: this is what we call serendipity. But what is serendipity? By definition, it’s the occurrence…

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